In its simplest form, git worktree add <path> automatically creates a new branch whose name is the final component of <path>, which is convenient if you plan to work on a new topic. For instance, git worktree add ../hotfix creates new branch hotfix and checks it out at path ../hotfix. To instead work on an existing branch in a new worktree, use git worktree add <path> <branch>. On the other hand, if you just plan to make some experimental changes or do testing without disturbing existing development, it is often convenient to create a throwaway worktree not associated with any branch. For instance, git worktree add -d <path> creates a new worktree with a detached HEAD at the same commit as the current branch.

If a working tree is deleted without using git worktree remove, then its associated administrative files, which reside in the repository (see "DETAILS" below), will eventually be removed automatically (see gc.worktreePruneExpire in git-config[1]), or you can run git worktree prune in the main or any linked worktree to clean up any stale administrative files.

I was under a common engineer misapprehension that BFE [Big Freaking Enterprise] sales requires playing golf, inviting clients to steak dinners, and having budgets beyond to reach of small businesses. This is not 100% true: you can hack the BFE procurement process to your advantage. Let's dig into how.

You might have heard that although salt is very common, growing crystals with it is hard.

Yes, and no. Growing big, transparent salt crystals is indeed very difficult, but anyone can easily grow a beautiful cluster at home.

But while there are many tools to automatically renew certificates for publicly available webservers (certbot, simp_le, I wrote about how to do that 3 years back), it's hard to find any useful information about how to issue certificates for internal non Internet facing servers and/or devices with Let's Encrypt.

I want to detail some techniques you can leverage to make your Maven builds faster in this post. The following post will focus on how to do the same inside of Docker.

I love spreadsheets. Spreadsheet programs like Microsoft's Excel, Apple's Numbers and Google Sheets are the secret heroes of our civilization.

I've also been interested in personal finance and the FIRE community for a while—not so much in the early retirement aspect but in the financial literacy it teaches its members. I have combined my passion for both into one mega-spreadsheet that I use to track my income, expenses, savings and investments in one overview. While creating this spreadsheet I got proficient in some new formulas, which I'll share here—and also write down for my own reference.

So you're all done recording your next song. You've laid down final takes for all the tracks, mixed everything and decided on the final master. Congrats!

But before you call it a day and prepare to distribute to streaming platforms, there are a few things many musicians forget to do that can take their song to the next level.

Are you prepared to receive and process privacy access requests in compliance with the GDPR? The following guide will help you understand your role in promoting access to data and how to create a system that saves you time and prevents damage to your reputation.

This page explains use cases and examples of SSH tunnels while visually presenting the traffic flows.

But it turns out that Firecracker is relatively straightforward to use (or at least as straightforward as anything else that's for running VMs), the documentation and examples are pretty clear, you definitely don't need to be a cloud provider to use it, and as advertised, it starts VMs really fast!

So I wanted to write about using Firecracker from a more DIY "I just want to run some VMs" perspective.

I'll start out by talking about what I'm using it for, and then I'll explain a few things I learned about it along the way.

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