h-feed is a simple, open format for publishing a stream or feed of h-entry posts, like complete posts on a home page or archive pages, or summaries or other brief lists of posts. h-feed is one of several open microformat draft standards suitable for embedding data in HTML.

HTTP is fundamental to modern development, from frontend to backend to mobile. But like any widespread mature standard, it's got some funky skeletons in the closet.

Some of these skeletons are little-known but genuinely useful features, some of them are legacy oddities relied on by billions of connections daily, and some of them really shouldn't exist at all. Let's look behind the curtain:

Axe is an accessibility testing engine for websites and other HTML-based user interfaces. It's fast, secure, lightweight, and was built to seamlessly integrate with any existing test environment so you can automate accessibility testing alongside your regular functional testing.

Gradient Magic is the largest gallery of CSS Gradients on the web, with new and exciting gradients added every day.

CSS Gradients are fancy patterns created via CSS, primarily used to add color or patterns to a website. They have many benefits over images, including being easier to work with and much smaller in size.

A set of common UI elements with a hand-drawn, sketchy look. These can be used for wireframes, mockups, or just the fun hand-drawn look.

If you're setting up a service where people can register their own usernames to be used as a hostname (username.example.com), email address (username@example.com), or URL path (example.com/username) within your domain, there are some common names you should avoid letting the general public register.

...

This is a list of all the names I know that should be restricted from registration in automated systems. If you know of others, please let me know and I'll update this page.

From author's notes:

Let’s get this straight: The effort to host Google web fonts on your own server is immense! First of all you need to download all .eot, .woff, .woff2, .ttf and .svg files, then copy them onto your server and finally paste a CSS snippet.

Sounds easy? Well it could be, if Google would actually provide any direct links to download these files and a customized CSS for self-hosting them. To fix this problem without using font generation services like Font Squirrel, I decided to publish a little service called google-webfonts-helper.

According to Google’s own Page Speed Insights audit (which Google recommends to check your performance), the AMP version of articles got a performance score of 80. The non-AMP versions? 86. Mind you, the AMP versions are hobbled - unauthorised javascript interaction is forbidden by Google, so you can’t vote or comment in place - it’ll kick you to the full version of the page. This is the fruit of weeks of labour converting the site: a slower, less interactive, more clunky site.

CSS Grids have been around a long time. Often they come bundled in frameworks such as Bootstrap. I'm not a Bootstrap hater, but sometimes using a framework is overkill if all you really need is a grid. Here's how to make your own CSS Grids from scratch.

A target image is provided as input. The algorithm tries to find the single most optimal shape that can be drawn to minimize the error between the target image and the drawn image. It repeats this process, adding one shape at a time. Around 50 to 200 shapes are needed to reach a result that is recognizable yet artistic and abstract.

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