DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) lets an organization take responsibility for a message while it is in transit.

The organization is a handler of the message, either as its originator or as an intermediary. Their reputation is the basis for evaluating whether to trust the message for delivery. Technically DKIM provides a method for validating a domain name identity that is associated with a message through cryptographic authentication.

delatt: Delete attachments. delatt strips attachments from email, and can optionally save the attachments to files. It will work with either mbox or maildir files.

It's great for archiving old email without wasting space on attachments and the extra HTML message parts that some MUAs attach.

SOGo is fully supported and trusted groupware server with a focus on scalability and open standards. SOGo is released under the GNU GPL/LGPL v2 and above.

SOGo provides a rich AJAX-based Web interface and supports multiple native clients through the use of standard protocols such as CalDAV, CardDAV and GroupDAV.

Last night, TechCrunch reported that Google will now require sites that import e-mail addresses from Gmail to also allow export of their data. The move was clearly aimed at Facebook, which has kept Google from accessing their users’ data. In response, many people have mentioned that while Facebook lets users download some data, they’re still not able to download an e-mail address book of their Facebook contacts. However, that’s not quite the case. Back in March, I published a guide to exporting data from Facebook using various tricks and FQL queries. Facebook has since made changes and added tools which have made the post a bit outdated, but much of the information still applies. In particular, I described using Yahoo’s contact import tool to download an e-mail address book for all your Facebook friends. This technique relies on a Facebook-approved feature and should not violate the site’s terms of service. A few specific steps have changed a bit, so I’ll recap the process here.

"We can't send mail farther than 500 miles from here," he repeated.

"A little bit more, actually.

Call it 520 miles.

But no farther."

Designing an HTML email that renders consistently across the major email clients can be very time consuming. Support for even simple CSS varies considerably between clients, and even different versions of the same client.

We’ve put together this guide to save you the time and frustration of figuring it out for yourself. With 23 different email clients tested, we cover all the popular applications across desktop, web and mobile email.

The guys at gravatar.com offer a nice service: for website owners, they let you automatically associate an avatar to your users, through the user's email address. The users who register to gravatars.com are able to change their gravatar and the change will be visible on all gravatar-enabled websites where they registered with the same email.

...

There is a piece of information which must be made public, though. It's this 32 char string which serves as a token for your web browser to retrieve the right image. How much information are we leaking to the bad people inhabiting the internet? Can that key be used to retrieve our email?

But such services as YourHackerz.com are still active and plentiful, with clever names like "piratecrackers.com" and "hackmail.net." They boast of having little trouble hacking into such Web-based e-mail systems as AOL, Yahoo, Gmail, Facebook and Hotmail, and they advertise openly.

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www.zarafa.com/, posted 2009 by peter in email linux messaging software

Zarafa combines the usabillity of Outlook with the stability and flexibility of a Linux server. Not only Outlook is supported natively, but users can use also the web 2.0 Outlook "Look & Feel" webaccess and all ActiveSync compatible mobile devices.

An installation and configuration guide to mlmmj. This guide includes howtos for the tunables, and also information on how to make mlmmj play nice with different mail servers.

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